Mid to late 18th century English tin-glazed earthenware ointment pot | It would have been a remedy or ailment to cure illness, probably a prized possession reused later in the household. Most ointment pots contained a type of animal fat, used as a carrier for a range of chemical ingredients. I chose this because it is my best find. I have a preference for apothecary and medical related finds. It was found in 2011 on the site where I originally did my archaeology fieldwork training with TDP, a spot I regularly visit and adore.
English porcelain doll’s head, 19th century | I am particularly attached to this find as it has a great story behind it. It was found by accident in Oxfordshire after the Thames burst its banks in 2012. I was having a walk on the Thames path and nearby fields when the water receded and it was just lying at my feet. This is my only non-tidal Thames find, I love to think of the river giving me ‘river blessings’ even when I am not looking or taking a break from larking. It also reminds me that most of my favourite finds are from the Victorian period.
Soyer’s Nectar, Hamilton bottle, c. 1849 | A carbonated blue coloured lemonade drink created by Victorian celebrity chef Alexis Soyer. This would have been flavoured with raspberry, apple, quinces, lemon juices and spiced with cinnamon. This is an extraordinary, once-in-a-lifetime find. I found in winter on an extremely low tide in the mud next to ship timbers, at my favourite river spot. I will remember this day forever. Through the find, I embarked on a journey to rediscover the many talents and life of Alexis Soyer, a flamboyant French fellow expat and celebrity chef of the Reform Club.
Mid to late 19th century salt-glazed stoneware flagon fragment | Possibly from a large 3 Gallon merchant’s wine, spirit or cider flagon with a strap handle. | I absolutely love the feel and texture of this find, smooth at the front, rough at the back, chunky and heavy. Three is my lucky number and I was born on that day. It reminds me of historical pub houses along the river banks and of past Londoners having a good time. It is also the river’s sarcastic way of reminding me of my French origins, as most of my finds tend to be food or drink related.
Medicine glass vial, late 19th – early 20th century | It has the number 20 stamped at the bottom so this is a modern find, probably machine-made and mass manufactured locally in London. It means a lot to me as it was my first almost intact glass find from my favourite muddy patch of the river. I kept it as I found it, uncleaned, because I love the obscure and gloomy feel to it. I love to imagine it was a narcotic based medicine such as an opium vial, fallen from a doctor’s bag or a domestic medicine chest cabinet, or consumed by an elegantly dressed decadent dandy or poet.
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Lucie's Finds

Mid to late 18th century English tin-glazed earthenware ointment pot | It would have been a remedy or ailment to cure illness, probably a prized possession reused later in the household. Most ointment pots contained a type of animal fat, used as a carrier for a range of chemical ingredients. I chose this because it is my best find. I have a preference for apothecary and medical related finds. It was found in 2011 on the site where I originally did my archaeology fieldwork training with TDP, a spot I regularly visit and adore.
English porcelain doll’s head, 19th century | I am particularly attached to this find as it has a great story behind it. It was found by accident in Oxfordshire after the Thames burst its banks in 2012. I was having a walk on the Thames path and nearby fields when the water receded and it was just lying at my feet. This is my only non-tidal Thames find, I love to think of the river giving me ‘river blessings’ even when I am not looking or taking a break from larking. It also reminds me that most of my favourite finds are from the Victorian period.
Soyer’s Nectar, Hamilton bottle, c. 1849 | A carbonated blue coloured lemonade drink created by Victorian celebrity chef Alexis Soyer. This would have been flavoured with raspberry, apple, quinces, lemon juices and spiced with cinnamon. This is an extraordinary, once-in-a-lifetime find. I found in winter on an extremely low tide in the mud next to ship timbers, at my favourite river spot. I will remember this day forever. Through the find, I embarked on a journey to rediscover the many talents and life of Alexis Soyer, a flamboyant French fellow expat and celebrity chef of the Reform Club.
Mid to late 19th century salt-glazed stoneware flagon fragment | Possibly from a large 3 Gallon merchant’s wine, spirit or cider flagon with a strap handle. | I absolutely love the feel and texture of this find, smooth at the front, rough at the back, chunky and heavy. Three is my lucky number and I was born on that day. It reminds me of historical pub houses along the river banks and of past Londoners having a good time. It is also the river’s sarcastic way of reminding me of my French origins, as most of my finds tend to be food or drink related.
Medicine glass vial, late 19th – early 20th century | It has the number 20 stamped at the bottom so this is a modern find, probably machine-made and mass manufactured locally in London. It means a lot to me as it was my first almost intact glass find from my favourite muddy patch of the river. I kept it as I found it, uncleaned, because I love the obscure and gloomy feel to it. I love to imagine it was a narcotic based medicine such as an opium vial, fallen from a doctor’s bag or a domestic medicine chest cabinet, or consumed by an elegantly dressed decadent dandy or poet.

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