Georgian anchor motif cufflinks | Found on the foreshore between two large rocks. The anchor motifs were revealed after a specialist cleaning (by Jason Sandy) to remove the debris particles.
Blue glass bead | A keen eye can discover the most minute finds. I selected this bead for its colour and minute bubbles within the bead.
Copper alloy cent from Penang, Pulu (Prince of Wales Island), issued by the East India Company in 1787 (Recorded by Portable Antiquities Scheme LON-7389DC Museum of London). | Found on a stony area of the Thames foreshore. I chose this find to show an interesting example of the diverse global range of historical currency found on the Thames foreshore.
Filgree Fragment
Japanese Harima Seal, 20th Century
Decorative seed pod | I picked this up thinking it was a natural seed pod. However, it has a hard exterior. It’s so detailed and intriguing, I have yet to identify it.
Section of a Georgian Buckle
19th century tailor’s button | Manufactured for Thomas Newman (b. 1888) of 55 Rotherhithe Wall, London Part of an ornate Georgian buckle
Large chevron patterned 18 – 19th century glass trade or slave bead used as currency for commodities and the slave trade. | I found this bead partially submerged in the Thames ‘gloop’. When I held it in my hand, it evoked my heritage. I have wondered where the bead was manufactured – possibly in the UK or Italy, whose hands it has been through and whether it has ever been used.
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Fran's Finds

Georgian anchor motif cufflinks | Found on the foreshore between two large rocks. The anchor motifs were revealed after a specialist cleaning (by Jason Sandy) to remove the debris particles.
Blue glass bead | A keen eye can discover the most minute finds. I selected this bead for its colour and minute bubbles within the bead.
Copper alloy cent from Penang, Pulu (Prince of Wales Island), issued by the East India Company in 1787 (Recorded by Portable Antiquities Scheme LON-7389DC Museum of London). | Found on a stony area of the Thames foreshore. I chose this find to show an interesting example of the diverse global range of historical currency found on the Thames foreshore.
Filgree Fragment
Japanese Harima Seal, 20th Century
Decorative seed pod | I picked this up thinking it was a natural seed pod. However, it has a hard exterior. It’s so detailed and intriguing, I have yet to identify it.
Section of a Georgian Buckle
19th century tailor’s button | Manufactured for Thomas Newman (b. 1888) of 55 Rotherhithe Wall, London Part of an ornate Georgian buckle
Large chevron patterned 18 – 19th century glass trade or slave bead used as currency for commodities and the slave trade. | I found this bead partially submerged in the Thames ‘gloop’. When I held it in my hand, it evoked my heritage. I have wondered where the bead was manufactured – possibly in the UK or Italy, whose hands it has been through and whether it has ever been used.

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